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Book Review: Finlay Donovan Jumps The Gun (Finlay Donovan, #3) by Elle Cosimano

Finlay Donovan Jumps The Gun (Finlay Donovan, #3) by Elle Cosimano is the latest installment in the Finlay Donovan book series.  It opens with Finlay needing to identify who a contract killer is before Mob Boss Feliks does or else she will be killed.  Unfortunately, Finlay thinks the killer is a dirty cop, so she and Vero go undercover at a citizen's police academy to figure out who it may be, and chaos ensues. I'd like to thank NetGalley, St. Martin's Press, and Minotaur Books for the Advanced Reader's Copy of Finlay Donovan Jumps The Gun (Finlay Donovan, #3) by Elle Cosimano.  I was thrilled to be approved to receive this book for free in exchange for my honest review. Elle Cosimano has done a phenomenal job with this series making each sequel more believable.  After a rough start with the series, I've come to love most of the characters and the books.  I think the only character that I don't particularly care for is Finlay's ex-husband Steven.  Where I

Book Review: Ramona the Pest (Ramona Quimby, #2) by Beverly Cleary

Ramona Quimby #2
Reading Ramona the Pest (Ramona Quimby, #2) by Beverly Cleary as an adult for the first time ever was a delight. How did I never read this book as a child? Maybe if this had been recommended to me by a teacher or librarian, I would have enjoyed reading in elementary school a lot earlier than I did.

Beverly Cleary did an amazing job of capturing how a five year old acts in kindergarten. I felt like I was back in school again. When I was in kindergarten, there was a morning class and an afternoon class. Unlike the book, we didn't have nap time because there wasn't enough time with such a short day. I enjoyed that the kids were in charge of certain things in the classroom like passing out the art supplies because that sort of thing was a huge deal when I was a kid.

I loved the fact that Ramona misunderstood a few things that her teacher said because kids of that age often misinterpret what is said by adults by no fault of their own, and they often do things that they think are no big deal but in actuality is a big deal like Ramona pulling Susan's hair, even though it was mostly innocent on her part. The one thing that bothered me in the book was that Susan was a tattle tale but never got in trouble by Miss Binney. The tattle tales rarely get in trouble in real life in my experience, so I guess Beverly Cleary was spot on with this, but why does this happen? 

The way the kids in the book teased each other and blew things out of proportion was spot on too. An example of this was when the other kids teased Ramona about being a kindergarten dropout. The teasing happens all too often in real life. How did Beverly Cleary capture kids so well in Ramona the Pest? This was a wonderfully written story for kids that adults can enjoy reading with their kids. I give this book five out of five stars.

Synopsis of Ramona the Pest (Ramona Quimby, #2) Ramona Quimby is finally old enough to go to school, and she is super excited about starting kindergarten. The precocious five year never means to be a pest, but it just happens. What adventures does Ramona have in her first year of school?


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