Book Review: Ashley's War, The Untold Story of a Team of Women Soldiers on the Special Ops Battlefield by Gayle Tzemach Lemmon

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Ashley's War:  The Untold Story of a Team of Women Soldiers on the Special Ops Battlefield by Gayle Tzemach Lemmon is a non-fiction book published in April 2015.  The story follows several women and their quest to become the first women to be in combat along the Green Berets and Army Rangers. This is a book that was selected in my workplace for discussion between women and/or veterans.  The book discussion was broken into three parts much like how the story was broken up.  It garnered great conversations. Some of the things that happened in the book didn't surprise me, such as how physically demanding the tryouts were to be part of the special operations.  It's a demanding job that requires people to be not only physically strong but mentally strong.     What did shock me was that it took the military so long to allow women to fight along men on the battlefield.  Another thing that astonished me were how accepting most of the men in the Army Rangers were of the women fight

Book Review: The Secret of the Old Clock (Nancy Drew Mystery Stories, #1) by Carolyn Keene

The Nancy Drew Mystery Stories by Carolyn Keene is a book series that my mom introduced to me in middle school. I remember falling in love with it immediately, so as part of my quest to read my way through my childhood, I had to reread it again. Of course, I started with the first book in the series, The Secret of the Old Clock (Nancy Drew Mystery Stories, #1). There were a few things that ran through my mind reading it as an adult that I know I didn't think of as a child. 

Most importantly, this book was originally published in May 1930, and I didn't give it a second thought that cars were still relatively new in the United States and that it was highly unlikely that an eighteen year old would have their own car let alone a convertible. What surprised me the most is that at least the first book had been rewritten since its original publication date. So, I have purchased a copy of what is supposed to be the original story through ThriftBooks.com. I am hopeful that it really is the original story, and I can't wait to compare the two versions.

Other things that I didn't really think much of when I originally read this story as a kid is that Nancy's dad, Carson Drew, is an attorney, and he obviously is a very good lawyer because he has a live in housekeeper that also has served as a nanny of sorts for Nancy. That isn't a common thing for people who are middle class. Then, there is the clothing stores where customers actually have a seat and wait for a sales clerk to wait on you. Wow, times sure have changed since then! And, the writing in The Secret of the Old Clock (Nancy Drew Mystery Stories, #1) is very mature. I think kids today would be shocked at some of the words that are used because they aren't commonly used words today . . . words like shan't.  

The Secret of the Old Clock (Nancy Drew Mystery Stories, #1) is extremely well written and held my interest even as an adult. I even think children today would enjoy this first installment in the series despite it missing some of the modern conveniences of today like cell phones and computers. I gave it four out of five stars.

Synopsis of The Secret of the Old Clock (Nancy Drew Mystery Stories, #1) by Carolyn Keene:  By pure chance, Nancy Drew witnesses a little girl named Judy fall off a bridge and rushes to help her. When she helps Judy home, Nancy gets roped into searching for the missing will of Josiah Crowley, which supposedly leaves money to Judy's aunts.


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