Book Review: Ashley's War, The Untold Story of a Team of Women Soldiers on the Special Ops Battlefield by Gayle Tzemach Lemmon

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Ashley's War:  The Untold Story of a Team of Women Soldiers on the Special Ops Battlefield by Gayle Tzemach Lemmon is a non-fiction book published in April 2015.  The story follows several women and their quest to become the first women to be in combat along the Green Berets and Army Rangers. This is a book that was selected in my workplace for discussion between women and/or veterans.  The book discussion was broken into three parts much like how the story was broken up.  It garnered great conversations. Some of the things that happened in the book didn't surprise me, such as how physically demanding the tryouts were to be part of the special operations.  It's a demanding job that requires people to be not only physically strong but mentally strong.     What did shock me was that it took the military so long to allow women to fight along men on the battlefield.  Another thing that astonished me were how accepting most of the men in the Army Rangers were of the women fight

Book Review: Spying in High Heels (High Heels, #1) by Gemma Halliday

High Heel Mysteries by Gemma Halliday
I've been in a bit of a reading slump the past few months . . . nothing really has been able to keep my attention very well, not even books by my favorite authors. So, I've been doing a lot of rereading of some of my favorite books, including those from my childhood, in hopes to get out of my slump. I recently had the yearning to reread the first book in the High Heel Mysteries by Gemma Halliday.

Synopsis of Spying in High Heels by Gemma Halliday:  Maddie Springer works as a fashion designer . . . that is a designer for kids shoes. In the midst of her current project of designing "Strawberry Shortcake" tennis shoes for tots, her attorney boyfriend, Richard Howe, cancels their lunch plans and goes missing. Howe becomes the prime suspect in a murder and fraud case involving his client Devon Greenway. Wanting to clear her boyfriend's name, Maddie is determined to insert herself into the police investigation in any way she can.

I enjoyed Spying in High Heels a lot better the second go around because I was in the mood for a light hearted, laugh out loud, cozy mystery. And, I did do a lot of laughing out loud. It takes a really talented author to make me actually laugh because I'm just a very serious person.  There were too many scenes to count that were hilarious. Many of the parts that made me laugh were parts where Maddie was acting ditzy in front of the main detective, Jack Ramirez. Some of the things she said or did, I could definitely relate to because I've definitely had my ditzy moments. (Can I just say that I totally love the character of Jack Ramirez and want a real life version of him and his family?)

The premise of the book is somewhat a believable story line, but don't go into it thinking this is going to be serious literature as it is a light hearted read that is fun . . . chick lit if you will. Certain situations were not very believable, so you really need to be able to suspend belief. And, there were quite a few typos that you'll need to ignore, but I'm not going to complain too much about it since I got the first five books in the series in a book bundle on my Nook Simple Touch (black and white ereader) for a total of 99 cents. The editing does get better as the books go along if memory serves me right.

If you're looking for quick read that doesn't take too much attention to follow along, I'd definitely recommend Spying In High Heels by Gemma Halliday. I gave it three out of five starts.


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