Book Review: Welcome Home, Caroline Kline by Courtney Preiss

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Welcome Home, Caroline Kline by Courtney Preiss opens with Caroline Kline couch surfing in New York City due to her no longer having a job and her fiance breaking up with her. The cherry on top is when Caroline finds out her father is not doing well and has to go home to New Jersey to help out. She finds one thing she didn't expect . . . true love. I received an Advanced Readers Copy of Welcome Home, Caroline Kline from NetGalley for free in exchange for my honest review.  The synopsis of this book was intriguing, and I absolutely love baseball, so I couldn't wait to dig in to this story. Unfortunately, the story started off a bit slow and continued to be slow at points throughout the book. The slowness of the plot made it difficult to stay interested in the characters and their fate.  At one point, I didn't really care if I finished the story or not. With that being said, I'm glad I stuck with the book because the last 15% of Welcome Home, Caroline Kline started to

Book Review: Mischief Nights Are Murder (A Poppy McAllister Mystery, #8) by Libby Klein

book review mischief nights are murder a poppy mcallister mystery libby klein

Mischief Nights Are Murder (A Poppy McAllister Mystery, #8) by Libby Klein was published on July 25, 2023.  The story opens with Poppy McAllister not being happy about being coerced into the Cape May Haunted Dinners Tour during the Halloween season.  Feeling a bit overwhelmed about breaking up an argument between some of her guests, Poppy is dismayed when one of them turns up dead.

Thank you to NetGalley and Kensington Books for the Advanced Readers Copy of Mischief Nights Are Murder (A Poppy McAllister Mystery, #8) by Libby Klein.  I love a great mystery, especially as it gets closer to Halloween, so when my request to read this book was approved, I was thrilled.

This was the first book I've read by Libby Klein, and it was a well written story that kept my attention.  Although, it's the eighth book in a series, it could be read as a stand alone.  The author did a relatively good job of giving the reader some backstory of each of the characters, so I didn't really feel like I missed out on anything.  With that being said, I personally like reading books in a series in order.  

Most of the characters were likable and relatable.  Of course, there were a handful that weren't likable, but I would deem one of the obnoxious characters as one that you love to hate . . . under all the gruffness and nastiness of the character, she ended up being not quite so unpleasant.  One of my absolute favorite characters was the cat named Fig.  He just absolutely stole the show for me.  There were an abundance of characters in Mischief Nights Are Murder, and at times, I found myself having trouble keeping up with who was who.  Because of this, it took just a little of the enjoyment out of the story.  

There were plenty of red herrings in the novel, and I kept changing my mind as to who committed the murder.  I never figured out who did it and was shocked at who it turned out to be.  Even though the culprit is revealed, there is a huge cliffhanger at the end of the story.  This doesn't bother me in the least since I enjoyed the book and plan on reading all the other books in the series.

Four out of five stars is what I give Mischief Nights Are Murder (A Poppy McAllister Mystery, #8) by Libby Klein.  This is the perfect book to put you in the mood for Halloween without it being scary or horrifying.  For those of you who don't like a lot of swearing, you'll be glad to know that there isn't any in it.


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