Book Review: Finlay Donovan Rolls The Dice (Finlay Donovan, #4) by Elle Cosimano

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Finlay Donovan Rolls The Dice (Finlay Donovan, #4)  by Elle Cosimano opens with Finlay Donovan and her nanny, Vero, planning a trip to Atlantic City to pay off some debts, find Javi, and retrieve a stolen car.  But first, they come up with a cover story that backfires miserably.  Finlay and Vero have to be clever and sneaky to accomplish what they set out to do, but will they have to come clean? Thank you, NetGalley, for the Advanced Readers Copy (ARC) of Finlay Donovan Rolls The Dice (Finlay Donovan, #4) by Elle Cosimano.  This is one of the books I was most excited about being able to read before it was in stores.  I received the eBook for free in exchange for my honest review. The fourth installment picks up where the last book ended and ties up the loose ends from Finlay Donovan Knocks Them Dead (Finlay Donovan, #3)  . . . so much so that I thought that this was going to be the last book in the series.  However, Finlay Donovan Rolls The Dice ends up having a couple of cliffhangers,

Book Review: The Face on the Milk Carton (Janie Johnson, #1) by Caroline B. Cooney

book review the face on the milk carton by caroline b cooney

The Face on the Milk Carton (Janice Johnson, #1) by Caroline B. Cooney opens with Janie Johnson and her friends laughing and joking at lunch about the missing children on the milk carton. As Janie takes a closer look at the carton, she realizes the face staring back at her is that of her three year old self. How could this be happening?

Even though this was an extremely popular book in my middle school years, I had completely forgotten about The Face on the Milk Carton until a friend marked it as 'read' on Goodreads.com. I immediately ordered a used copy of this book as well as some of the others in the series. I was surprised that there were five books in the series as I thought there were only two books. 

On top of that, I was stunned to find out that Caroline B. Cooney was the author as I knew her only as writing horror novels for young adults. I must not have read the book as a kid because I think I would've remembered who wrote it. However, I do know that I did watch the television movie starring Kelli Martin, and the ending of the book is somewhat different from what I remember being said in the movie, which is another reason why I don't think I ever read the book before.

With that being said, I thought The Face on the Milk Carton was written exceptionally well, and I was surprised at how well written it is, especially considering the target audience is twelve to fourteen year olds. The character of Janie Johnson was spot on . . . she was clearly upset to find out that she might have been kidnapped and obsessed about how she should handle the situation. I mean who wouldn't act the way she did if they were a teen in the same position? The descriptions of Janie's friends and how they acted were written perfectly. It definitely took me back to my high school years (and made me glad that I wasn't in high school anymore)!

I love how Caroline B. Cooney handled the topic of child abduction, and it's still a relevant topic all these decades later. The only thing that dates the book a little is that cell phones weren't as prominent back then as they are now, and they definitely didn't have GPS on them to use for directions. So, I think kids today would wonder what pay phones are and wonder why they were stopping to ask for directions instead of using their cell phone.

Five out five stars is what I gave The Face on the Milk Carton (Janie Johnson, #1) by Caroline B. Cooney. If you enjoyed this book, I recommend Missing (Fear Street, #4) by R.L. Stine.


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